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RECENT COURSES


ANTHROPOLOGY AND COLONIALISM
Department of Sociology/Anthropology
School of Social & Behavioral Sciences
Stockton University, Spring 2019

The aim of this course is to develop an anthropological and historical understanding of the development of the world system through colonialism and decolonization—understood as struggle and negotiation with existing and possible worlds. The course will introduce students to the critical challenges facing anthropology today as it has studied and taken part in the profound historical transformations between the "postcolonial present"and the "colonial past.” It will also examine decolonization as both an ongoing historical aspiration and methodological practice in the field of anthropology and related disciplines. Students will be expected to engage in anthropological readings, facilitate classroom discussions, and develop global and critical thinking skills.

BORDERS AND SANCTUARY
Department of Sociology/Anthropology
School of Social & Behavioral Sciences
Stockton University, Fall 2018 & Spring 2019

What are borders, what do they represent, and what could a world without borders look like? The aim of the course is to critically analyze the ways the U.S. border is situated at the center of a number of political, cultural, and economic experiences of life. It also looks at the politics of the new sanctuary movement as a call to civil disobedience and a vision of social justice in the wake of immigration detention and deportation. Students will be expected to engage in historical and ethnographic readings, facilitate classroom discussion, and develop critical thinking and writing about border politics.

REVOLUTION BY THE BOOK: DESIGN, POLITICS, AND ACTION
School of Art, Media, and Technology, BFA
Parsons School of Design, Spring 2018

Revolution by the Book: Design, Politics, and Action explores the ideas and practices that go into making books as an artist-activist pursuit. The course will focus on the political art of publishing—including curating, editing, building ideas through books; design and layout; and distribution—understood as a form of media activism. We will explore political book publishing mainly through non-fiction writing but will also have opportunities to explore poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and found text. The course will investigate: (1) media-activist tactics and strategies involved in publishing; (2) a history of writing, design, and publishing as "propaganda"; (3) writing, editing, and production as a political act; (4) and case studies of political publishing houses.

DESIGN AND URBAN PRACTICE HISTORY LAB: THE TEMPORAL CITY
M.S. Design and Urban Ecologies and M.A. Theories of Urban Practice
School of Design Strategies at Parsons, The New School

In this course, we investigate the temporality of the city. Together we seek to understand how time relates to the urban across a range of spaces, scales, and conditions. Our goal is not only to examine the development of cities over time, but also to construct what historians call a “useable past”—that is, an account of the ideas and practices that emerge out of urban life and that present lessons for solving problems. “If we would lay a new foundation for urban life,” Lewis Mumford wrote, we must identify those values that emerge from the history of cities as well as “those which may still be called forth.”

Understanding the evolving form and meaning of cities is crucial for urbanists. For centuries, cities have concentrated symbols of power and domination in their built environments. And yet, cities are more than static reflections of social structures; urban spaces serve as key sites through which people struggle over, sustain, legitimize, and challenge power relations. Cities also concentrate and intensify mediations of the everyday world, whether in language, writing, art, performance, tools, infrastructure, networks, or human relationships to nature.

The Design and Urban Practice History Lab examines the city as an always unfinished proposition, both deeply conscribed by long-term forces and subject to sudden rupture and transformation. We consider varied scales and modes of urban change, differential impacts of such change on particular urban spaces, and the multiple ways in which we reckon change through aesthetics, design, politics, and other practices. We also read across disciplines, from history and literature to anthropology, sociology, architecture, and planning. 


URBAN DESIGN CELL ACADEMY: RIGHT TO THE CITY
Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture @Studio X, Mumbai | October 2015
(In Coordination with Studio-X Mumbai/Columbia University)

This 10-day intensive, part of the Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture Urban Design Cell Academy, introduces the concept, practice and possibilities of the Right to the City framework. Beginning with the history of urban social movements in the city of Mumbai, the program explores the origins and nature of urban struggles around the world, and debate the potential of the Right to the City framework for a political re-imagination of urban life. The program includes city walks, seminars, presentations and conversations, and is open students, researchers, activists, and anyone who is interested in these questions. Cotaught with Shweta Wagh, Hussain Z. Indorewala, and Simpreet Singh. [Read More]


CITY, COMMONS, AND SOCIAL STRUGGLES
Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture, Mumbai | Winter 2014
Urban Theory Elective

This seminar asks participants to be collaborators in thinking through two lines of questioning:

• First: What is the Indian city? What constitutes urbanism in India today? What is the state of our social relations in the metropolis?
• Secondly: What are the social imaginaries and mental conceptions of the urban world one shares?  What are the conditions under which we could dare to imagine an urban society based on “commons”? That is, how might we understand cities as a terrain for socialities and economies based on solidarity and interdependence, cooperatives of free association, and relations of free cooperation? 

We will investigate these questions through three interlacing modules: (1) imagining and investigating the contemporary city (2) theorizing commons and urban commoning, and (3) contemporary conflicts and social struggles over the city.

DEVELOPMENT AND DIFFERENCE
KRVIA, Mumbai | Summer 2015
Urban Theory Elective


INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Baruch College
, New York | Fall 2009
Sociology and Anthropology Department  

POWER AND CONFLICT
Baruch College, New York | Spring 2010
Sociology and Anthropology Department


SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND SOCIAL CHANGE
Hunter College
, New York | Fall 2007–Spring 2008
Sociology Department